Stewart's Corral

Measuring Electrosmog (part 8)
page 61

visitor #

prelude

In part one I discussed in 2011 how to measure and map the cellular reception, using a disabled clamshell 2G cel phone.
Then when 3G started rolling out, I showed how noisy and unhealthy cellular phones are. I graphed the spectrum, and videoed the results from my meters, making several available by DVD and this web page.
I could only think of smartphones as an unhealthy addiction. (7 years later many industry leaders are concluding this as well. See link)
As the years passed and smartphones became more sophisticated, every time a person glued to their fondle slab came near me I felt adverse reactions, starting with pain. I did not want to be around other people, so I pursued horseback riding and getting back to nature, trying to put my technical background behind me.

Several years pass, and now with the rollout of 4G LTE, my diminishing health due to increasing microwave levels, and the loss of my horses (a double slam from this neighborhood), I turn my attention again to measuring and mapping my area. In Part 7 I did extensive mapping with spectrum analysis for 2016, but found it difficult to pin frequencies to towers and cellular services.
Broadband meters like the Cornet ED-88T are great for painting an area with a broad brush, but don't deliver that level of detail I sought. (Where is this frequency transmitting from? Where are the towers, and conversely, where is it safe?)
Dedicated meters are unlikely to ever do so. Why? Because of smart phones. Why build dedicated hardware that can't be upgraded when new bands become approved, when portable quad-core (and now octa-core) computers running apps can do the job easier? All the hardware necessary to make the measurements, is right there. Only the software is missing.
Look at the Canary Hotspotter. They won't make another version to cover the new 802.11ac and .11ad bands. It's not profitable. Same with Cornet ED-15SA (which is still very useful for the 2.4Ghz band). Likewise, keeping up with cellular is impossible. There are now 74 global bands created for 4G, and no sign of stopping.

My answer, because smart phones are noisy and unhealthy. Bad for the user, bad for people around you, bad for the environment. Even if you believe that EMR does not affect you, or you are blessed with resistant genes and can be exposed to several joules of energy, what will you believe when you realize the trees, the birds and bees are dying because of all this un-natural pulsed energy?
Using smart phones, actively participating in the wireless revolution is not a real solution for electro-sensitive or environmentally conscious and responsible people.
Right?
Well, maybe not.
In late 2016 I noticed that not all smart phones are noisy. People who respected my needs to turn off their devices, mostly did so. I started getting curious as to why I could not feel some of them, the ones that were still on, why some did not bother me or cause quick reactions, and so down this rabbit hole I went. Here is what my research has revealed.

Moving past broadband meters

Why is a smart phone unhealthy?
How can these concerns be mitigated or removed? The top 3 should be considered by everybody.
Yep, that problem again. In Part 3 I did extensive measuring of different devices and components found indoors. Finding a quiet desktop computer is like looking for a needle in a haystack. It is not an easy task.
I already know that iPhones and some iPads have a bad reputation for being exceptionally noisy and strong. There are videos on Youtube showing measuring their emissions when not in active use by the person, just sitting on the table.
Some touchscreens are horrible, but some are not bad. The differing LCD technologies also create different emissions.
The Samsung screen is AMOLED. This looks to be better than backlit LCD, and OLED looks to be the best and lowest emission choice available.
A metal or aluminum case will reduce emissions from getting out, although Samsung seems capable of engineering a quiet board with only a plastic case. (Looking at the Galaxy S5)
A search for portable computers with metal case, lots of bands, no NFC, and no QI, narrows down the list of possible choices.
(I am not looking for a celphone or smartphone, as these imply talking and transmitting.) I'm looking for a mobile computer with 4 to 8 low-energy cores that does not hurt me, with the right radio chip to act as a measurement tool.

The following measurements are taken with the device powered on, not sleeping, screen on, airplane mode on, wifi off, NFC off, bluetooth off, doing something with a low cpu load (not video).
E-field is measured without holding meter, (body voltage influences readings), and not moving across the magnetic lines of force.
(green indicates approval, red is bad)
Magnetic 000
bb
00
0.144
ff
44
0.288
ff
88
0.5cc
ff
cc
0.8ff
ff
bb
2.5ff
cc
88
5.0ff
cc
00
9.0ff
aa
00
30ff
66
00
100ff
44
44
200ff
00
00
mG
Electric 01241015203050100500V/m
RF 00.00050.0010.0110.050.10.23870.515100mW/m²
00.0130.0190.0640.1370.1940.3000.4340.6141.3736.14V/m
Safe Color scale slides depending on radius of detectable bubble. Short distance shown. Extreme

background level M 0.0 mG
E 0 V/m
RF 0.000 mW/m²
RF
<0.02 V/m
RF
2 at sensitivity 10
RF 0.0083 V/m
0.1827 µW/m²
< -65 dBm
<7.1 mV ADC
M
0.05 mG
E
8 V/m
baseline level
device being measured TF2 peak
(not moving)
at zero distance,
and radius of bubble
Acoustimeter
at zero distance, and
distance for audio to disappear
Zap Checker 180
at zero distance, and
distance to get 5 at 10
Cornet ED85-EX
at zero distance, and
distance to background level
GaussMeter
at zero distance,
and distance to
get <= 0.2mG
Cornet ED88T
E-Field at zero distance,
and distance to get down to background
Samsung Galaxy S5 G900A
front side screen
M 1.1 mg
  2 inches
E 15 V/m
  0.25 inch
RF 4.039 mW/m²
  1.234 V/m
  2 inches
0.02 V/m

0.5 in.
(1 cm)
30 at sensitivity 10

1 in.
(2.5 cm)
0.0083 V/m
-65 dBm
7.2 mV ADC

0 in.(0 cm)
2.5 mG

2 in.
(5 cm)
26 V/m

2 in.
(5 cm)
Samsung Galaxy S5 G900A
back side
M 0.7 mg
  2 inches
E 4 V/m
  0.25 inch
RF 0.046 mW/m²
  0.132 V/m
  1 inch
0.02 V/m

3.5 in.
(9 cm)
35 at sensitivity 10

1 in.
(2.5 cm)
0.0218 V/m
0.0012 mW/m²
-56 dBm
7.9 mV ADC

0.25 in.(0.6 cm)
6 mG

3 in.
(8 cm)
17 V/m

0.5 in.
(1 cm)
LG Nexus 5 D820
front side
  0.02 V/m

3.5 in.
(9 cm)
90 at sensitivity 10

2.5 in.
(6 cm)
-65 dBm
0.1827 µW/m²

7.5 mV ADC

5 mG

4 in.
(10 cm)
96 V/m

1 in.
(2.5 cm)
LG Nexus 5 D820
back side
  0.02 V/m

2 in.
(5 cm)
30 at sensitivity 10

1.25 in.
(3 cm)
-65 dBm
0.1827 µW/m²

7.5 mV ADC

4 mG

2 in.
(5 cm)
380 V/m

2 in.
(5 cm)
source: NFC
LG G5 RS988
front side
 
0.04 V/m
8 in.(20 cm)
or
23 in.(58 cm) when touching screen
70 at sensitivity 7
10 at 6

3.2 in.
(8 cm)
-65 dBm
0.1827 µW/m²

7.5 mV ADC

2.5 - 6 mG

4 in.
(10 cm)
86 V/m

2 in.
(5 cm)
LG G5 RS988
back side
  0.02 V/m

3 in.
(7 cm)
15 at sensitivity 10

0.25 in.
(1 cm)
-65 dBm
0.1827 µW/m²

7.1 mV ADC

9 mG

3 in.
(8 cm)
14 V/m

0.2 in.
(1 cm)
HTC One A9
front side
M 3.2 mg
  1.5 inches
E 10 V/m
  0.25 inch
RF 2.674 mW/m²
  1.004 V/m
  2 inches
0.02 V/m

3 in.(8 cm)
20 at sensitivity 10

2.5 in.
(6 cm)
-65 dBm
0.1827 µW/m²

7.2 mV ADC

27 mG

3.5 in.
(9 cm)
12 V/m

0.25 in.
(1 cm)
HTC One A9
back side
M 3.2 mg
  4 inches
E 11 V/m
  0.25 inch
RF 0.041 mW/m²
  0.124 V/m
  0.25 inch
0.04 V/m

3 in.
(8 cm)
20 at sensitivity 10

4 in.
(10 cm)
-55 dBm
1.832 µW/m²

11.8 mV ADC

58 mG

2.75 in.
(7 cm)
35 V/m

1 in.
(3 cm)
Samsung G930A
front side
  0.02 V/m

0.7 in.(2 cm)
26 at sensitivity 10

0.6 in.
(2 cm)
-65 dBm
0.1827 µW/m²

7.2 mV ADC

2 mG

0.5 in.
(1 cm)
20 V/m

0.3 in.
(1 cm)
Samsung G930A
back side
  0.03 V/m

0.2 in.
(1 cm)
6 at sensitivity 10

0 in.
(0 cm)
-65 dBm
0.182 µW/m²

7.1 mV ADC

2 mG

0.5 in.
(1 cm)
24 V/m

0.2 in.
(1 cm)
Amazon Kindle Fire 10.1   0.02 V/m

6 in.
(15 cm)
  -65 dBm
0.182 µW/m²

7.2 mV ADC

0.6 mG

0.5 in.
(1 cm)
323 V/m

1 in.
(3 cm)
Google Pixel
front side
M 4.2 mg
  2 inches
E 13 V/m
  0.25 inch
RF 0.713 mW/m²
  0.518 V/m
  1 inch
0.02 V/m

1 in.(2 cm)
80 at sensitivity 10

2 in.
(5 cm)
-65 dBm
0.182 µW/m²

7.2 mV ADC

4.5 mG

3 in.
(8 cm)
14 V/m

1.5 in.
(4 cm)
Google Pixel
back side
M 1.3 mg
  2 inches
E 11 V/m
  0.25 inch
RF 0.028 mW/m²
  0.103 V/m
  0.25 inch
0.02 V/m

1 in.
(2 cm)
50 at sensitivity 10

1 in.
(2 cm)
-65 dBm
0.182 µW/m²

7.2 mV ADC

6 mG

3.5 in.
(9 cm)
11 V/m

2 in.
(5 cm)
LG V30 H932U
front side
M 5.9 mg
  5 inches
E 20 V/m
  2 inches
RF 2.761 mW/m²
  1.020 V/m
  2.5 inches
0.02 V/m

2 in.(5 cm)
14 at sensitivity 10

2 in.
(2 cm)
7.1 mV ADC

below threshold
18.5 mG

2.5 in.
(6 cm)
54 V/m

3 in.
(8 cm)
LG V30+ US998U
front side
M 9 mg
  2 inches
E 61 V/m
  1 inches
RF 1.722 mW/m²
  0.806 V/m
  1.5 inches
0.02 V/m

2 in.(5 cm)
10 at sensitivity 10

0.5 in.
(1 cm)
7.1 mV ADC

below threshold
5.9 mG

3 in.
(8 cm)
29 V/m

8 in.
(20 cm)
When Charging
Lines below have: device is on, airplane mode on, Wifi off, Location off, NFC off, Bluetooth off, screen off (locked or sleeping)
Samsung G900A
during charging
M 1.7 mg
  2 inches
E >1000 V/m
  14 inches
RF 0.327 mW/m²
  0.351 V/m
  5 inches
0.02 V/m

6 in.
(15 cm)
60 at sensitivity 5

17 in.
(43 cm)
7.9 mV ADC 6 mG

1 in.
(3 cm)
488 V/m

11 in.
(28 cm)
Nexus 5
during charging
  0.04 V/m

2 in.
(5 cm)
50 at sensitivity 10

8 in.
(20 cm)
7.1 mV ADC 23 mG

2 in.
(5 cm)
930 V/m

8 in.
(20 cm)
HTC One A9
during charging
M 2.8 mg
  2 inches
E >1000 V/m
  29 inches
RF 0.158 mW/m²
  0.244 V/m
  4 inches
0.02 V/m

3 in.(8 cm)
30 at sensitivity 10

3 in.
(8 cm)
4 mG

1 in.
(3 cm)
767 V/m

12 in.
(26 cm)
Samsung G930A
during charging
  0.03 V/m

6 in.
(15 cm)
20 at sensitivity 5
or 100 at 6
9 in.
(23 cm)
7.5 mV ADC 3 mG

1.3 in.
(3 cm)
66 V/m

3 in.
(8 cm)
Google Pixel
during charging
M 1.3 mg
  2.5 inches
E >1000 V/m
  26 inches
RF 1.906 mW/m²
  0.848 V/m
  3 inches
0.03 V/m

3 in.(8 cm)
95 at sensitivity 6

12 in.
(30 cm)
7.7 mV ADC

14 mG

4 in.
(10 cm)
696 V/m

12 in.
(30 cm)
LG V30 H932U
during charging
M 5.8 mg
  2 inches
E 990 V/m
  28 inches
RF 0.203 mW/m²
  0.277 V/m
  4 inches
0.03 V/m

0.5 in.(1 cm)
85 at sensitivity 10

11 in.
(28 cm)
7.1 mV ADC

14.1 mG

8 in.
(20 cm)
986 V/m

18 in.
(46 cm)
The TF2 is the only one capable of detecting the pulsating charging and functioning of the touch screen. This shows a good reason to use a stylus pen, instead of your fingers.
On the positive side, the Samsung Galaxy S5 G900A is quieter than my Canon camera. Quieter than my desktop monitor. That's stunning.
So it IS possible to do the impossible. Some of it makes sense, the mobile computing chips are designed for low power consumption, thus more likely to be low-emissions or low EMI. My attitude toward portable computers will need adjusting. Even though 99.99% of them are used for unacceptable purposes. Quite the dilemma, from a philosophical point of view.

I don't actively seek out cell phones to measure, so I don't have an extensive presentation for this table. But I have measured an E-field in the several hundreds V/m from a visitor's touch-LCD screen, on battery power. I don't know which brand. Someday I hope to add more solid data to this chart. In fact, 3 models have already been added to the first, provoking a conclusion that maybe the Samsung G900A was like a diamond in the rough, since no other device tested so far is as quiet and tolerable. Maybe my earlier attitude is not so wrong after all...

Here are the operational problems I reveal. So overall, I can not use the hardware to it's full potential. Therefore the reason my search did not stop with device #1.

By "mapping safely" I mean: No transmitting and logging, for weeks or months without needing to connect online.

On to getting results, I recommend the following software:
(On the G900A) With the bloatware removed, battery usage is practically zero when the screen is off. That is a big deal. Many people complain about battery drain in stock (unaltered-from-the-vendor) models.
Using the developer codes, for some models, I can select which band to listen on, one at a time, so after several trips into town, after 2 months I got a complete picture of how many cells there really are. 30 confirmed unique IDs. Plus more since I know there should be activity on at least one band I can't measure without newer hardware.
At home I can measure 2 cells on 2G, 2 cells on 3G band 5, and 1 cell on 4G band 17. Despite being 7 miles from the nearest tower. Not far enough...

Then on 2017.Jan.05 the 2G services were sunsetted. Turned off. About 1/3 of the background went quiet. I noticed. It is better, but not a big part of the pie anymore. All the clam shell GSM emergency phones are now junk and useless. Instantly obsolete, by design.
Then over the next week, new 4G cells were added to make up for the loss. Oh, and now another 3G cell... Since 2G was an always on whine, I'll tenatively say this should be better, and since I can now prove the 2 new towers built in late 2015 are still not active (at least not in the primary cellular bands), the situation here is not all doom and gloom.

Here's what my setup looks like in action. There was a LOT more exposure from 2G cells than 3G or 4G.

Too bad Samsung devices (for which they have a reputation) do not report neighbor cells signal strength correctly (always for 3G, seen above in screenshot # 3). This is the most useful data to determine by echo-location and shadow-mapping which towers are responsible for which cells. When it says -121 all I know for sure is it is below (weaker) the primary cell. Moving on to testing a non-Samsung device (# 4) shows this problem can definitely be solved, although when the neighbor lines go flat, it is clear the device is not tracking fully. The level shown sticks to the last known level, until it reaches a timeout 20 or 30 seconds after last contact.

The Nexus gives a wierd sucking feeling that I recognize as RFID and NFC being strong. Putting my technician skills to use, I opened it and removed the offending parts. (The NFC in the Samsung was easy to remove as it was on the removable battery, I recommend Anker for the replacement, as it has no antenna, and does hold the rated capacity of 2800 mAh). It (back to the Nexus) does measure 3G neighbors correctly though, and does have the best reception of 4G band 4. There is hope I'll eventually find the right one. My research says the D820 might be rootable, (edit that, it is.) so that's a big positive.

The RS988 covers 7 of the 10 North America 4G bands. It does not give the nasty NFC/RFID feeling, but is not as quiet as the Samsung, since the screen is old-technology LCD, and wow why is this screen so noisy? The metal case can be a huge positive, but this case has a flaw in the connection to the antennas, and so is a major flaw out of the factory in design. This one gets the reject stamp and goes back to where I bought it.

Both the timeout and quality of tracking in gaps varies from manufacturer to manufacturer.

2017.Mar
I started this mapping because of the increasing level of pain and mental disfunctions. I expected to find the only problem source was from the new towers. I am both shocked and disappointed to see the 3G signal ID 509 in the above #3 screenshot taken Jan.08, is actually coming from nearby. Neighbor #1 knows I am sensitive to wireless, so either he does not care anymore, or he is now able to suspend belief against me. Since his behavior has been hostle toward me, it's easy to conclude it is intentional. He has threatened me a few times, and his language toward me is foul.
The signal strength rises as I walk toward the SE corner of my property:

The in-home cellular hot spot has an unusual LAC-CID and seems to take over the Qualcomm firmware, making itself the dominant signal and always making the other signals (from Franson Peak) disappear. The PSC also changes daily, but stays within a range from 504 to 509.
If anybody thought sunsetting 2G would improve the situation, they were wrong. Health wise that is. From a corporate financial viewpoint, this is great for the economy... Everybody is motivated to buy new toys, and certainly has increased my purchasing of pharmeceuticals to keep functioning.

Now I am seeing these in-home cellular stingray hotspots popping up everywhere with poor coverage. Currently averaging 1 or 2 per mile. Unbelievable.
On the negative side, this will only accelerate the health crisis that is coming..

update added 2019.Nov In the last 2 years since the hotspots have popped up, I have seen the number of insects and birds decline, here. Not just in the city, but here, rural too. When I go to a quiet zone, I see more insects and birds and spider webs. But at home, each year has less life. I see eggs not hatching in the bird nests. Remember microwaves are linked with infertility...
Back to 2017:


The only services online providing coverage maps, may work very well for cities with thousands of volunteer contributors, but out here they are very inadequate:
Open Signal mapping, Republic, WA
Mozilla Location Service shows mapping my area, but doesn't show signal strength. Another Samsung flaw. Seems they only show measurements from paying customers with sims and contracts. Well, that excludes me. If I want coverage maps, I have to do it myself!

2017.Jun
The maps I've generated over 6 months of measuring 66,560 data points, are now posted here, covering: CDMA (2.5G), UMTS (3G), LTE (4G) band 4, band 13, and band 17. They make more sense when the terrain of valleys and hills are added. Here are the results for north Ferry county, from Franson Peak near Curlew to Union Ridge and Knob Hill overlooking Republic:
2019.Oct-2020.Aug
Plus 3 years, the cellular database now has 1,210,383 data points, plus the internet service over WiFi database now has 97,044 data points. I've rebuilt the tools necessary to handle this much larger size, wrote my own programs to do the mapping, and yes it took 2 years. The epidemic of digital dementia is affecting me too. Updated maps are animated showing each cell and it's sector of the circle, one band (frequency range) per map:
All measurements show PEAK values across several devices, not average, and not likely what your mobile will get, since results do naturally vary from day to day.

The new animated maps show how the location of a tower can be pinpointed by where the 3 sectors converge in the center. One antenna covers 120 degrees of the circle, thus 3 antennas per tower per carrier service.
BandDownlink
Frequency (MHz)
Carrieryear
added
2.5G / CDMA
0879-887Verizonc.1999
3G / UMTS / WCDMA
21952.2T-Mobile2019?, not local
42152.5T-Mobile
5871.6
876.2
AT&Tc.2003
4G / LTE
21935.0Inland Cellular2019.Sep
2020.Jan around Curlew Lake
1982.5AT&Tnot local
42125.0Verizon
2145.0T-Mobile
5871.5AT&Tnot local
12731.5T-Mobile
13751.0Verizon
17739.0AT&T2009
26___._Sprintc.2019
71629.5T-Mobile2019.May
_____._First Netc.2019
5G
71___._T-MobileMap says: commercially available
2020

[Enlarge] Coverage maps
by carrier.



Zoomed out to NE Washington State
and SE British Columbia

Now the 3 years of traveling and recording measurements can be seen, and why the database has grown so large.
Compare to 2019 before band 2 was added in January.

Discovering the Cell IDs on distant towers also brings closure to the occasional recordings not seen locally, usually on the mountain passes.
In one case a new CID recorded on the Kettle Crest (high elevation), turned out to be from a tower 60 miles away. And another one 53 miles away.
Just last month I caught another one halfway up the hill here above home, with one bar on band 71 for under a minute, that because of the mapping effort, I recognize to be from 47 miles away. Not a useable signal, but it is an example of how much EMR there is in the air.

[Enlarge] All cellular in northwest Ferry County, with topographic by ASTER
, partial opacity with aerial photography.

Add topographic layer to clarify why some areas get coverage and others don't. It's all about:
1. the terrain, casting shadows.
2. the band frequency, higher frequencies are only strong in line of sight.
3. how much power (watts) the carrier powers the tower with. and
4. how good the reflections bounce into shadowed valleys, bouncing off the rocks.


I still hate cell phones. They are evil. Transmitting, they ruin health and lives, and are bad for the environment. But if used correctly as a mobile portable computer, like a small laptop, it can be a useful tool. There is still a clear line of demarkation. However it still does not feel right, as if I'm somehow showing approval of technology again, a step backwards. When there is a need to keep some distance from the device, I see a new unanticipated use for those silly selfie sticks.

I hope you find something useful from my tips and experience that can help you too. None of the above screenshots required any special skills or rooted software. The basic apps are free to download and try out.


"How am I doing?" My health updates are consolidated at part 2


Reduce your exposure.
Safety Tips:
Turn OFF WiFi. It transmits beacons 10 times per second. This is a high amount of exposure.
If you must use it, then turn it back off when done.
Turn ON Airplane mode. It transmits every time you move into range of a new cellular tower, or out of range of the previous one. Several services also check for new mail or messages every 30 seconds on average.
Cell phones were created for emergency purposes only, and the inventors never saw this coming, glued to the thing 24 hours a day exceeds the safety standards, because TIME is part of the equation as much as POWER.
Turn OFF NFC and RFID. While this antenna array is low power, it still should be off when not in use. RFID chips are known to cause insomnia, assuming the other constant transmitting doesn't already do that to you.

When transmitting those cell phones look like this: (for comparison purposes)
Transmitting typical >6.0 V/m
overload

0.25 Miles
20 at sensitivity 4 10.4 V/m
289 mW/m²
59.1 mV ADC
>10 mG 458 V/m
device being measured Acoustimeter
at zero distance, and
distance for audio to disappear
Zap Checker 180
at zero distance
Cornet ED85-EX
at zero distance, and
distance to background level
GaussMeter
at zero distance,
and distance to
get <= 0.2mG
Cornet ED88T
E-Field at zero distance,
and distance to get background

The ICNIRP guidlenes for cell tower radiation exposure are the worst in the world. Several health effects have been reported much below these ICNIRP guidelines.

The ICNIRP state that these guidelines are only for short term exposure and considers only thermal effects and does not take account non thermal effects which are more harmful and occurs much below thermal effects. According to calculations the ICNIRP guidleines implies that a human body can be safely kept in a microwave oven for 1166 secs = 19 minutes per day!!

In USA, max. SAR limit for cell phones is 1.6W/Kg which is for 6 minutes. It has a safety margin of 3 to 4, so a person should not use cell phone for more than 18 to 24 minutes per day. This information is not commonly given to users.


The amount of electromagnetic radiation we are exposure to, has increased 1 quintillion times over background levels. (1 followed by 18 zeros)

To measure the earth's schuman resonance now, scientists must go to the open ocean to "hear" it.


Have you read the fine print in your phone's manual? It says to keep away from skin at least 1 inch.
This makes ear pods and wearable tech look like a very bad idea. Video measuring ear pods, and measuring Apple watch, celphone, devices around a modern home.

Do you know the mobile industry has written their License Agreements to have NO LIABILITY for health claims.

Scientists have authored 28,000 papers, of which 14,000 are peer reviewed, published in scientific journals, over several decades now, showing clear cases of harm. Yet in the media we only hear, There is no solid evidence for harm , there is no convincing evidence, or there is no valid evidence for harm... but be sure, there IS evidence.

Index About Me and EHS
Introduction
and Awareness.
Real or imagined

About me, part 1
How it started
About me, part 2, Living with EHS
Conversion chart and entry table
Searching for EM Smog in Rural Outdoors
Meter Evaluation
Features to Look For
Specifications
Emissions
More Meters Evaluation in Urban
Measuring a cell phone
Updates up to 2018
Indoor Equipment Evaluation
part 3

Measuring cellular part 8


Spectrum analysis graphs part 7
LIBRARY—
Health Links

part 4,
Book and video recommendations,
Top research picks.

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Stewart Andreason


ehs_cellular.html Updated 2020.Aug.31